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How to find chords in  major scale Indian songs

 When any beginner start playing the keyboard, he have absolutely no clue about chords. Beginners used to wonder how do people play using both their hands. Go to ragatracks scale chords section and it will yields good results. As we know music has form like the skeleton that holds your flesh, muscles, and skin up. If you had no bones, no skeleton, your flesh and all the other parts of you would fall on the floor.  Because you  have a skeleton so you are able to walk around and pretty accurately predict which way your next step will take you.

It's the same in music. Music has form like a skeleton to hold it up. And that skeleton is made out of chords (harmony) the tonal center of the song or piece. In any given key or scale you can play in, there are primary chords. They are like family members of that particular key. In any given key or scale, there are 3 "family members" that are residents of that key,  the I chord, the IV chord, and the V chord. They are far the most likely chords to occur in any given key.

In below given table you will find the 3-note (triad) I-IV-V  chords for each of the twelve (12) major keys or scales. We shall begin with the key of "C" and proceed through to the twelfth chord which is "B". Practice the I-IV-V chord progression in all twelve keys. Try playing the 3-note (triad) I-IV-V chord progression chords with your left hand, while playing the major scale for each chord with your right.

 I - IV - V Chord Progression

Scale

I Chord

IV Chord

V Chord

C Major

C Major

F Major

G Major

C#/Db Major

C#/Db Major

F#/Gb Major

G#/Ab Major

D Major

D Major

G Major

A Major

D#/Eb Major

D#/Eb Major

G#/Ab Major

A#/Bb Major

E Major

E Major

A Major

B Major

F Major

F Major

A#/Bb Major

C Major

F#/Gb Major

F#/Gb Major

B Major

C#/Db Major

G Major

G Major

C Major

D Major

G#/Ab Major

G#/Ab Major

C#/Db Major

D#/Eb Major

A Major

A Major

D Major

E Major

A#/Bb Major

A#/Bb Major

D#/Eb Major

F Major

B Major

B Major

E Major

F#/Gb Major

Example: C Major Scale and its I - IV - V Chords shown in above table.

Chords                 I                    IV     V
Note No.              1      2      3     4      5     6     7
C Major Scale = C     D     E     F     G     A     B

 For example, if I am playing in the Key of C, and the first chord is the C chord and I have to guess what the next chord is, I would guess that it would be either the F chord or the G chord. Why? Because those are the other "family members". So how could I tell whether it should be F or G?

 If the melody is a "B", then the chord is probably a G chord. Why? Because "B" is in the G chord, but is not in the F chord.

If the melody is a "A", than I would guess that the chord is F. Why? Because "A" is in the F chord, but is not in the G chord.

Does that mean that there are always just 3 chords in a song? No, but there are literally hundreds of songs that are made of just 3 chords.

In the given table you will find the 3-note (triad) I - IV - V  chords for each of the twelve (12) major keys or scales. We shall begin with the key of "C" and proceed through to the twelfth chord which is "B". Practice the I-IV-V chord progression in all twelve keys. Try playing the 3-note (triad) I-IV-V chord progression chords with your left hand, while playing the major scale for each chord with your right. When any beginner start playing the keyboard, he have absolutely no clue about chords. Beginners used to wonder how do people play using both their hands. Purchase western e.book from ragatracks and it will provide tips and  yields good results.

 Follow the below given steps:

 Step 1: Identify the notes of the song corresponding to the tune. The song will include only those chords which are combinations of these notes.

 Step 2: Analyze the song, line-by-line. Divide each line of the song into logical segments, call each segment a measure. There's more to a measure of a song that what is mentioned here. For simplicity, we call it a segment or a measure. A measure can typically include 3-6 notes of the tune. Now the question is, where do you set the break points in order to get measures of a line of song? Here's the simple rule of thumb: Follow your intuition! Look at it is, and  set the breakpoint at the transition of the song from one scale to another. Now, "scale" is yet another technical term like "measure". Please note that all these terms are used in a very general sense in context.

 Lets take an example. "Yeh mera dil" a song from film Don.

 Yeh mera dil pyaar ka deewana

 Deewana deewana pyaar ka parvana

 Aata hai mujhko pyaar mein jaljaana

Listen to the song keeping an eye on the segmentation above. Sounds right?

Play the first line ("Yeh mera dil pyaar ka deewana") using only three chords. The original song might include many more, but the tune can be contained in three chords.

Step 3: Having identified the measures, the next task is to map each measure to a chord. The rule for this is, the chord that correctly maps to the measure should include as many notes of the measure as possible. For instance, look at this:

Yeh mera dil

D   E D  E C

The chords C and Aminor include both the notes E & C. But how ironical,  play Dminor chord for this measure. An exception in the very beginning! Well, its like this. Generally, the note with which the song begins determines the "scale" of the song. Most of the chords would be centered around this note.

Try playing this measure with C, Aminor and Dminor. You'll see the difference yourself.

Simple chords table

Step 3.1: Given a measure, using the table above,  identify all possible chords (only major, minor and flat) that include the notes of the measure. Then set the "accompaniment" of your keyboard to on, and play the notes of the measure with each chord. The chord that perfectly carries the tune of the measure is the one we go with. Somewhat a brute force approach, but for a layman like, it sure works.

Step 3.2: Once you get a rough idea of the chords for a line (like "yeh mera dil pyaar ka deewana"), play them in sequence without playing the notes. If you can identify the tune by playing just the chords, your chords are right! Otherwise, use your judgement and tweak the chord combination by reconsidering those chords that you've discarded in step 3.1 above.

Repeat steps 3.1 and 3.2 for each line of the song.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



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